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Reports

Search filters applied: 2004 .

Published

Actions for Shared Corporate Services: Realising the Benefits

Shared Corporate Services: Realising the Benefits

Whole of Government
Internal controls and governance
Shared services and collaboration

Under appropriate conditions, shared service arrangements are a proven method for obtaining significant cost savings from productivity improvements and economies of scale. Benefits realised in NSW from shared services are significantly below what was expected. At June 2003 general government agencies had achieved savings of $13.6 million, or 5 per cent, of projected accumulated savings of $297 million to be achieved by 2006. Implementation costs are esti

Published

Actions for Home Care Service

Home Care Service

Community Services
Management and administration
Service delivery

We recognise that Home and Community Care Services (HCS) operates in an increasingly difficult and changing environment. However, HCS does not have the capacity to meet these needs. Currently at least 50 per cent of those eligible to receive a service will miss out. Under the current system, there are inequities in service delivery. The ability to receive a service depends on when the applicant calls, where they live and if this coincides with service ho

Published

Actions for School Annual Reports

School Annual Reports

Education
Management and administration

We believe that school reports are an excellent concept. However, in their present form they are not an effective means of holding a school accountable. Successive performance audits by our Office have identified significant shortcomings in the reports. This is not so much the fault of the schools. The reporting content is largely optional. There is limited opportunity to compare performance. And the highly restrictive reporting protocols lead to reports

Published

Actions for Transporting and Treating Emergency Patients

Transporting and Treating Emergency Patients

Health
Service delivery
Shared services and collaboration

This audit follows our earlier studies on ambulance response times, on waiting times for elective (i.e. non-urgent) surgery and on the ‘Code Red’ status of hospital emergency departments. Those audits indicated that matching resources to the ever-increasing numbers of people seeking emergency treatment was certainly an issue, but not the only issue. We found that problems were also occurring at the ‘interface’ between different parts of the health system

Published

Actions for Meeting Business Needs

Meeting Business Needs

Whole of Government
Management and administration

Overall, compliance with government policy was not high. In the agencies examined, the audit found problems similar to those identified in 2001 when we last examined fleet management practices. Business need was not always the determining factor in deciding the size and composition of fleets. In most cases the fleet profile reflected past practices or individual choice rather than business need.   Parliamentary reference - Report number #124 - released

Published

Actions for Managing Natural and Cultural Heritage in Parks and Reserves

Managing Natural and Cultural Heritage in Parks and Reserves

Environment
Management and administration

Managing reserves requires that judgements be made about the condition of natural and cultural heritage and decisions taken as to what is, at least, an acceptable standard. Reliable information is fundamental to these tasks and for monitoring success, continuous improvement and accountability. In our opinion the Service has yet to clarify what constitutes success in reserve management and develop an adequate information base to measure its success. Conse

Published

Actions for Controlling and Reducing Pollution from Industry

Controlling and Reducing Pollution from Industry

Environment
Management and administration

The Environment Protection Authority (EPA) accepted all the recommendations in our 2001 audit report on Controlling and Reducing Pollution from Industry and has demonstrated leadership in addressing the issues raised. Most of the recommendations have now been fully or largely implemented. Major achievements include new measures to facilitate a more consistent approach to licensing, new risk assessment tools to assist in dealing with noncompliances and to